iA


User Outcomes Weekly – #2

by admin. Average Reading Time: about 2 minutes.

This is the second in a weekly series focusing on user outcomes at the intersection of education, technology and productivity. If you see anything here you’d like to discuss further or want to put into practice, why not get in touch?

(thanks to those who got in touch last week pointing out the formatting issues on mobile devices – that should be sorted now!)

Damn You Auto Correct! » 15 Most Popular Autocorrects From May 2011

Damn You Autocorrect

This website consists of user-submitted iPhone screenshots (Home button + Power button in case you’re wondering) of conversations after one party accidentally uses an autocorrected word in an amusing way. A case of user outcomes going bad.

Exploratree

ExploraTree

Doug used the resources from this site a few years ago for a curriculum redesign project in a school. As with most FutureLab resources, they’re high-quality, free and very useful: a set of thinking guides that can be used with children and adults alike.

aha! moments

BetterExplained

This is a great idea: sharing ‘aha!’ moments in Twitter-like ways to understand an idea. These are then curated to provide intuitive introductions to a particular topic. It’s capturing the moment when the ‘penny drops’ that’s the powerful idea here. One to watch.

How IT Shapes Top-Down and Bottom-Up Decision Making

How IT Shapes Top-Down and Bottom-Up Decision Making

Interesting stuff. It appears that improving communication within an organization usually leads to more top-down decision-making (rather than delegating responsibility and trusting people to get on with it).

David Starkey on why apps reflect his thought processes better than TV

David Starkey on why apps reflect his thought processes better than TV

This could be a marketing ploy, but what David Starkey says makes sense: apps allow for a non-linear, but feature-rich structure for content. This can be better than a ‘two-dimensional’ imposed narrative on events and ideas.

The Setup

The Setup

The well-known designer Frank Chimero shares how he rolls with hardware and software. It’s always fascinating to see how highly-productive and successful people organize their working lives.

All roads lead to philosophy, on Wikipedia

All roads lead to philosophy, on Wikipedia

Unsurprisingly, everything leads back to the subject of Philosophy on Wikipedia. Nice visualization and a good reminder of the importance of studying the root of subjects.

Cinch

Cinch

This software makes it easy to ‘snap’ windows to certain parts of the screen on a Mac. This is built-into Windows 7 and is an extremely useful feature. Time and annoyance-saving.

Mob rule: Iceland crowdsources its next constitution

Mob rule: Iceland crowdsources its next constitution

One of the best way to get people to buy into a project is to seek their opinion. Iceland is nvolving people in decision-making and getting more civic involvement through social media. We predict success.

The Social Media Rollercoaster

The Social Media Rollercoaster

Obvious when you think about it: why not auto-post images from rollercoaster rides to Facebook and other social media? Not only does this improve user outcomes (they go to where users would probably post them anyway) but it drives interest in the product.

SwarmDoc

SwarmDoc

SwarmDoc lets you make notes both online or offline (using an Adobe Air application). These are then synchronised with the option to make notes public and follow other people’s notes. This seems to combine some of the functionality of Google Docs and a wiki.

Project Reclaim

Project Reclaim

Boone Gorges reminds us of the importance of digital heritage and owning our own data. Doug has begun his own Project Reclaim here.